A picture of balloons saying "PPLS 2018" in a big room with windows.
Picture from when the graduation party hosted by my school after I graduated

It feels a bit meta to blog about blogging, yet here it is.

In 2017, I wrote a blogpost for the University of Edinburgh’s blog on teaching (fittingly called Teaching Matters) on what research says about attendance when lectures are recorded.

The post was the most read blogpost on the blog in 2018. This blogpost was written as it was a very commonly asked question by academics whenever lecture recording came up, and clearly it is still relevant.

Having now graduated university and no longer being a student intern (or really a poster child anymore, no one at Heriot-Watt has ever seen the infamous poster all over UoE campus) I stand by what I say more than ever. I actually attended most of my lectures, but I did have a lot of stuff going on besides my studies.

If I had not spent a lot of my time on extracurriculars, I would have never ended up working in learning technology and found an area so well-suited to me. My CV may still only have consisted of a degree and not much else, and I am so grateful I took advantage of just a few of the opportunities studying at UoE offered me. Shockingly, it has turned out that a degree teaches you a lot more than just subject-specific content – it teaches you lots of things from how to learn things quickly, to balance your time to meet as many deadlines as possible, working under pressure, working on things that does not interest you, meeting new people, and the list goes on.

If I missed a lecture here or there, it clearly was not detrimental to me or many of my friends who sometimes did the same. Be there for students to come to you with your concerns, but also accept we need to learn from our own mistakes.

We will usually turn out okay, I promise.